Documents

Contemporary Research Paper

The revival in the use of hot-mixed lime mortars has been gathering pace across the UK and Ireland over the past three years, and the use of quicklimes in conservation and repair is now becoming increasingly routine. This has injected new energy and insight into the wider lime revival, affecting not just construction mortars but also decorative finishes and surface treatments.

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Contemporary Research Paper

The "Hot Mixed Mortars Revival" has been the collective effort of Irish, Scots and English masons and conservation professionals and has reenergized the lime movement across the British Isles. This paper seeks to provide a narrative for this, as well as to summarise the essential benefits of hot mixed lime mortars for use in the compatible repair and conservation of old and historic buildings across the world.

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Contemporary Research Paper

A hot-mixed lime mortar is prepared using quicklime. Typically this involves a "dry slake", during which the quicklime is mixed with naturally moist or slightly moistened aggregate (sand, stone dust or subsoil). In the case of sand or stone-dust mortars, this initial dry slake is followed by the addition of water sufficient to produce a workable mortar for immediate or later use.

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Contemporary Research Paper

Most lime mortars, for most uses, for most of history, were hot-mixed using quicklime. Lime mortars commonly used today, for conservation and repair, or for new build, tend to be Natural Hydraulic Lime-based or designed ‘products’, less often putty lime mortars. This seems anomalous and confounds our general inclination towards like-for-like, compatible repair using authentic materials – as well as the requirement of BS7913 (1998).

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Contemporary Research Paper

The last five years or so have seen a revival in use of hot-mixed mortar. While many people have welcomed this as a way of making more authentic mortars for conservation, others are sceptical or even hostile to what they see as a new fad. Before exploring the pros and cons of hot-mixed mortars, it is worth reflecting on the past 40 years of lime use and how we have arrived at the current situation.

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Book (Introduction)

Traditional mortars are eminently workable, effectively porous, economic in use and appropriately durable. Used in buildings for thousands of years, these materials are ideal for repair and conservation work. Unlike cement or modern hydraulic lime, their routine use would make a significant contribution in the struggle against climate change. However, despite the 1975 'lime revival' there remains a deficit in research into the most-used traditional mortars. This book seeks to redress the balance.

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Contact Details

Hot Mixed Mortars
Hall Farmhouse
Maltongate
Thornton-le-Dale
North Yorkshire
England, UK
YO18 7SA

nigelcopsey@hotmail.com
www.hotmixedmortars.com

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